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Irene

Hasselback Potatoes

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Hasselback Potatoes

          image.png      Serves: 6  (adjust accordingly)

Traditionally, maincrop potatoes are used, but I love these made with new potatoes, too; in which case, Charlotte, which are waxy-fleshed and taperingly oval in shape, are best.  If you're using maincrop potatoes, avoid those huge floury monsters; moderately proportioned Cara potatoes, or similar, would be just fine for the job.  If you want to peel the potatoes, do, but I find it isn't necessary.

Ingredients

·         18 medium potatoes (oval shaped) or 36 new potatoes

·         45 grams butter

·         5 tablespoons olive oil

·         Malden salt

·         18 medium potatoes (oval shaped) or 36 new potatoes

·         3 tablespoons butter

·         5 tablespoons olive oil

·         sea salt flakes

Method

1.     If you're using the larger potatoes, preheat the oven to 210°C/gas mark 7/425ºF; for roasting new potatoes, preheat to 200°C/gas mark 6/400ºF. Put each potato, in turn, in the bowl of a wooden spoon, like you would carry an egg in an egg-and-spoon race, and cut across at about 3mm / one-eighth of an inch intervals.

2.     When you've cut them all, put the baking tin on the hob with the butter and oil and heat up till sizzling. Turn the potatoes well, putting them in upside down (ie, cut side down) first, then the right side up, and spoon the fat over them.

3.     Sprinkle each potato well with salt and put in the oven: cook the large potatoes for about an hour and 10 minutes, testing to see whether the flesh is soft (you may need another 10 minutes for this); 40 minutes should be fine for the new potatoes.

4.     Transfer to a warmed plate, and serve.

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We used to do a similar thing with extra cuts at 90° to the first set. We called these hedgehog potatoes.

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4 hours ago, Irene said:

Hasselback Potatoes

          image.png      Serves: 6  (adjust accordingly)

Traditionally, maincrop potatoes are used, but I love these made with new potatoes, too; in which case, Charlotte, which are waxy-fleshed and taperingly oval in shape, are best.  If you're using maincrop potatoes, avoid those huge floury monsters; moderately proportioned Cara potatoes, or similar, would be just fine for the job.  If you want to peel the potatoes, do, but I find it isn't necessary.

Ingredients

·         18 medium potatoes (oval shaped) or 36 new potatoes

·         45 grams butter

·         5 tablespoons olive oil

·         Malden salt

·         18 medium potatoes (oval shaped) or 36 new potatoes

·         3 tablespoons butter

·         5 tablespoons olive oil

·         sea salt flakes

Method

1.     If you're using the larger potatoes, preheat the oven to 210°C/gas mark 7/425ºF; for roasting new potatoes, preheat to 200°C/gas mark 6/400ºF. Put each potato, in turn, in the bowl of a wooden spoon, like you would carry an egg in an egg-and-spoon race, and cut across at about 3mm / one-eighth of an inch intervals.

2.     When you've cut them all, put the baking tin on the hob with the butter and oil and heat up till sizzling. Turn the potatoes well, putting them in upside down (ie, cut side down) first, then the right side up, and spoon the fat over them.

3.     Sprinkle each potato well with salt and put in the oven: cook the large potatoes for about an hour and 10 minutes, testing to see whether the flesh is soft (you may need another 10 minutes for this); 40 minutes should be fine for the new potatoes.

4.     Transfer to a warmed plate, and serve.

 

Two lots of butter?

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4 hours ago, andsome said:

Two lots of butter?

Well, I used two lots of butter & oil, in order to spoon the fat over them. 

I melted the second lot gently in a small frying pan to enable me to spoon he 'fat' over them during cooking. 

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I dare not risk that,my waistline would get even worse.

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13 hours ago, andsome said:

I dare not risk that,my waistline would get even worse.

:laugh:   It wasn't absorbed by the potatoes, it just coated the surfaces inside the slices. 

Whilst I was doing that, I very gently persuaded the slits open.  Consequently they roasted much better.  :wink:

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